For When You Can’t Find Home

The theme for this year’s Humanities Symposium is “Home,” and here at the Center for Public Humanities we have been critically thinking about what home means, both for communities and individuals. As the Humanities Symposium approaches, you will have the chance to hear from our very own Fellows about this subject. Here is a reflection from…

Organized Labor in Harrisburg

The Center for Public Humanities is interested in, among other things, the intersection between academics and place. By exploring the history of the labor movement in Harrisburg, we can highlight the city’s role within the larger movement of resistance and populism. At the end of the 19th century, the United States was quickly becoming the…

Taking Root Within

The theme for this year’s Humanities Symposium is “Home,” and here at the Center for Public Humanities we have been critically thinking about what home means, both for communities and individuals. As the Humanities Symposium approaches, you will have the chance to hear from our very own Fellows about this subject. Here is a reflection from…

Guarding Home for Another

The theme for this year’s Humanities Symposium is “Home,” and here at the Center for Public Humanities, we have been critically thinking about what home means, both for communities and individuals. As we approach the date for the Humanities Symposium, you will have the chance to hear from our very own Fellows about this subject. Here…

1517 or 2017: What Difference Does It Make?

October 31 marked the 500th anniversary of the posting of Martin Luther’s 95 Theses, which are widely recognized as the starting point of the Reformation. Many practicing Protestant Christians today identify a personal and spiritual connection with Luther and his Theses, one with a sense of fellowship and conviction than most other histories. However, we…

A Borrowed Anguish

The year 1851 marked a monumental change in both the development of American literature and in the abolitionist movement. At the time, slavery was both prevalent and popular, and although the owning of slaves was illegal in many Northern states, economic reasons and greed compelled the passing of the Fugitive Slave Law in 1850. This…

An Uneasy Peace: Interfaith Relations in a World of Religious Radicals

An Uneasy Peace: Interfaith Relations in a World of Religious Radicals On Sunday, September 17, I had the privilege of attending the annual Harmony Walk sponsored by the Interreligious Forum of Greater Harrisburg along with other interfaith organizations. The yearly event, which coincides with the United Nations International Day of Peace, brought together a collection…

Spaces of Fear

Last night, we heard from author and historian Taylor Branch as he shared “King’s Dream for Justice: Then and Now” for the American Democracy Lecture.  Now, we hear from Messiah College student, Arion, who offers a reflection on the lasting impact racism and segregation has had on our own city of Harrisburg.  With the growth…

A Tribute to Jim Weedon

I first met Jim Weedon in the Fall of 2014, on the front porch of his home in Harrisburg, PA. Jean Corey and I had driven there that afternoon to talk with him about his experience as a member of the 1954 Eastern Negro League Baseball Team, The Harrisburg Giants. I had been feeling anxious…

Ghosts

I see ghosts all around me. In the shadows of a city once bustling with culture, In the absence of brown faces, In the presence of white.   I see ghosts all around me. In cracked cement that will never be filled, In crumbling brick and stone, In “No Trespassing” signs where no one would…

The Lord’s Back Was Black

The poem is Jesus speaking to a slave master while he beats his slave. It explores the paradoxical reality of Christian slave owners in the 19th century. It speaks from the perspective of Jesus who identifies with the oppressed, persecuted, and marginalized. This assumption is drawn from the passage when Jesus spoke to Paul saying…

Welcoming Difference

On April 4th, I joined a small group of Messiah students, and alumni in attending the Sixth Annual Freedom Seder at Beth El Temple in Harrisburg. The topic of this year’s event was immigration, and the refugee crisis, focusing on how the three major monotheistic world religions of Christianity, Judaism, and Islam, are called to…