Class and Immigration

The Center for Public Humanities has the privilege of welcoming various speakers onto campus. The keynote lecturer at this year’s symposium was Edwidge Danticat, the highly respected poet, author, and speaker. Talking about immigration and refugees, she quoted Home, a beautiful poem by Warsan Shire, who wrote: “No one leaves home unless home is the…

Judging at History Day as a Fellow

Not many middle and high schoolers have the opportunity to complete their own historical research and to present their work competitively, but several students from South Central Pennsylvania have the chance at National History Day. Messiah College hosted the event on March 3 with the theme of “Conflict and Compromise.” The students came with the…

Finding Self-Expression Through Writing

When I was in the ninth grade, I wrote my first poem. Before then, I was not much of a writer. I had already completed a few (moderately terrible) short stories, and a couple Mother’s Day acrostics here and there, but this poem was different. It was my first piece that did not start with,…

A Little More Empathy

Empathy: One word that many of us probably hear frequently. Empathy is simply the act of taking on and relating to another person’s feelings. Imagine what our lives, our community, even our world would look like if more people practiced this daily. Our work places might be less hostile and more patient. Our interactions with…

Empathy in Place: Marilyn Nelson’s Poetic Tradition in Harrisburg

Poet Marilyn Nelson came to Messiah’s campus on Tuesday, April 3.  Also on Tuesday, twelve middle schoolers came to Messiah’s campus and read their poetry to a poet.  On this day, thirteen poets gifted their audience with their empathy as they brought to life historical figures from the full spectrum of American history and geography. …

A Letter to Joseph Payawesea

A mere half hour away from Mechanicsburg, the Carlisle Indian Industrial School was the first federally-funded off-Reservation boarding school for Amerindian children. The boarding school was founded in 1879 in Carlisle, PA by General Richard Henry Pratt, who publicly held the motto, “kill the Indian, save the man.” Thus, the boarding school system sought to “modernize” and assimilate Indian…

Home as Hospitality

The theme for this year’s Humanities Symposium is “Home,” and here at the Center for Public Humanities, we have been critically thinking about what home means, both for communities and individuals. Throughout that week (February 19-26), numerous people shared about this topic from many perspectives, and now Humanities Fellow Elisabeth Ivey will share her own reflection…

I Am From

The theme for this year’s Humanities Symposium is “Home,” and here at the Center for Public Humanities, we have been critically thinking about what home means, both for communities and individuals. Throughout that week (February 19-26), numerous people shared about this topic from many perspectives, and now Messiah College student Marina Moreira tells her story of…

The Paradox of Home

The theme for this year’s Humanities Symposium is “Home,” and here at the Center for Public Humanities, we have been critically thinking about what home means, both for communities and individuals. Throughout this week (February 19-26), numerous people shared about this topic from many perspectives, and now Humanities Fellow Brian Peters will share his own reflection…

Spelling Home

Many of the Fellows get to participate in the Poetry in Place workshop, where young students interact with different subjects in history and in their personal lives and produce poetry that interprets those experiences. Continue reading as Fellow Olivia McCullum reflects on this time through her own poem.    Spelling Home We sit at high, round…

Bearing Witness through Poetry

January was a month of retrospection. Taking a course entitled, “Rhetoric of the Civil Rights Movement,” I encountered the past everyday as I heard for the first time about the numerous people who stood resilient and nonviolent in their demand for freedom. Before that class, the Civil Rights Movement had been a vague time period…